HandsOnTurkish blog

News and articles relating to Turkish business and culture as well as project updates
Turkish Proverbs (part 3)

Turkish Proverbs (part 3)

One cup of coffee, forty years of friendship. Business comes in ounces, friendship comes in pounds. It is from the discourteous that the courteous learn courtesy. Owe nothing to the rich man, and be owed nothing by a poor man. The hand that gives is higher than the...

Turkish Proverbs (part 2)

Turkish Proverbs (part 2)

Turkish Proverbs relating to Animals, Nature and Living • It is from the head that the fish first stinks. • The planting of a tree is worth the prayers of a whole year. • The key to paradise is patience. • An onion offered in love is worth a sheep. • Falcons with...

Dinner with Turkish business partners

Dinner with Turkish business partners

Most business entertaining will take place in restaurants. Turks enjoy food and the meal is a time for relaxing and engaging in some good conversation. You will probably be expected to eat a great deal and your hosts may be offended if you don't.  TRelationships...

Cappadocia – one of the most beautiful regions in Turkey

Cappadocia – one of the most beautiful regions in Turkey

Cappadocia, a tourist attraction with stunning rock formations Lying right in the middle of Anatolia, north of the Taurus Mountains is Cappadocia. Cappadocia is considered one of the most beautiful regions in Turkey and attracts lots of tourists. They come to see the...

Turkish Oil Wrestling

Turkish Oil Wrestling

Oil wrestling - a national Turkish sport The Turkish Yağlı güreş means " fighting with oil". it is a long standing tradition in Turkey, in fact it is a national Turkish sport.  There is a big three day tournament in Kirkpinar Stadium in Edirne every year. Oil...

Konya, one of Turkey’s most  compelling cities

Konya, one of Turkey’s most compelling cities

Konya, a major city in Turkey Konya is a major city in the south-western edge of the Central Anatolian Plateau, at an elevation of over 1,000 metres. The plateau is covered with rich steppes, which have an impact on the agriculture sector. Additionally, the...

Three Language Learning Hacks

Three Language Learning Hacks

1. Be present  When learning any language, it is helpful to not think too far ahead. When you focus on how many words there are yet to learn, it can be overwhelming and lead to less progress. On the other hand, remind yourself often of how far you have come. Perhaps...

Reflections on Becoming Bilingual

Reflections on Becoming Bilingual

It has become common knowledge that knowing more than one language is good for the brain. It improves mental flexibility and makes it easier to switch between tasks. I recently attended a fascinating talk on bilingualism which was part of the University of Edinburgh’s...

Verbal Adjectives in Turkish

Verbal Adjectives in Turkish

Usually verbal adjectives, just like normal adjectives in Turkish, modify a “headword” – which is usually the noun that comes after it. Normal adjective: Tatlı kız – sweet girl Verbal adjective: Tatlı olan kız. – The girl who is sweet. Verbal adjective: Evleneceğim...

Turkish Etiquette – Do’s and Don’ts in Turkey

Turkish Etiquette – Do’s and Don’ts in Turkey

Paying separately in the restaurant -  uncommon. Wanting to pay separately when you go to a restaurant could be interpreted that you want nothing to do with the people around you. It is, therefore, common in Turkey that everyone pays the quoted price together. The...

Visiting a Turkish Hammam

Visiting a Turkish Hammam

Turkish baths: places for socialising, relaxing and purifying body and soul Turkish baths, called hammams (Turkish: hamam), became popular in Turkey in the 7th century and are an export of the Roman Empire. They were places of cleanliness, for purifying body and soul....

Verbal nouns in Turkish

Verbal nouns in Turkish

In the dictionary, all verbs in Turkish end with the stem -mek or -mak, according to vowel harmony. To make a verbal noun out of a verb, we usually take off the -mek or -mak, and add -me or -ma – in effect merely removing the k at the end. So yüzmek is to swim, but...